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Amelia Earhart – It Really Happened #5, October 1946

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In a time when very few people had flown in a plane, much less piloted one, being known as “an aviator” actually meant something. There was a certain dash, a panache, connected to the term “aviator”; it conjured thoughts of a daring, reckless character who was able to journey to mysterious, far off lands at the drop of a hat. Very few people in those days could lay claim to the appellation, and even in that rarefied company, Amelia Earhart was something special. Prior to the Second World War, women were expected to be homemakers or, if they worked outside the home, the options were essentially limited to secretary, nurse, telephone operator, or what we today would call “customer service”. But Earhart dared to be something more, a pilot who roamed the world, and became (along with Lindbergh, Post, and Rickenbacker) one of the four most famous aviators in America.

Then, while attempting to circumnavigate the globe in 1937, Earhart vanished without a trace over the Pacific Ocean. More

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The Veiled Prophet – Miracle Comics #4, March 1941

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The “backstory” to the comic book we feature in today’s post is one of the great true adventure tales of the Victorian Age. While it is certainly true that many Europeans of that era were virulently racist (“Wogs begin in Calais” as an Englishmen once stated), there were also quite a few who were legitimately curious about other cultures and religions, and a very few who went so far as to experience said cultures (even to the point of breaking many of their own culture’s taboos). The most celebrated among the latter was Sir Richard Francis Burton. More