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The Blue Tracer – Military Comics #1, August 1941

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Today is Veteran’s Day, a holiday which evolved from Armistice Day. Originally intended to recognize veterans of World War I, the holiday’s purpose was changed after World War Two to honor veterans of all United States wars. This is not the same thing as Memorial Day, which is intended to remember those who have died in American wars. Over the years the two have become not only conflated but nearly reversed in the minds of many citizens. Memorial Day was intended as a day of sombre remembrance. With the rise in the 1950’s of “consumer culture”, Memorial Day devolved into a happy, albeit unofficial (as well as astronomically incorrect), “first day of summer” rather than a day to remember the fallen. Veterans Day (somewhat unconsciously) in the minds of many became a conflated military holiday for recognizing the living and memorializing the dead. More

Blackhawk: Death and Resurrection (Part Three) – Military Comics #10, June 1942

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The last two posts to this blog were occasioned by the oft-repeated myth that, after his apparent death, the French airman André was reintroduced to Quality Comics’ Blackhawk series without any explanation for his reappearance. In those post, we’ve seen the stories which contained his apparent death and his (wholly explained) reappearance; now we’ll finish the trilogy with the tale that completes André’s reintroduction to the team. More

Blackhawk: Death and Resurrection (Part Two) – Military Comics #9, April 1942

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Three months ago I offered a post about the influence of Alexandre Dumas’ work on Golden Age comic writers and their tales. Today I introduce Exhibit B to the argument. More

Blackhawk: Death and Resurrection (Part One) – Military Comics #3, October 1941

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A few months ago I noticed that this blog was getting an occasional visitor from a reader (or readers) in China. I was cracking wise on my Facebook page about how my blog hadn’t yet been blocked by the Chinese government and I wondered what I was doing wrong.

This post’ll be the one that does it. More

The Origin of Blackhawk – Military Comics #1, August 1941

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Aviator comics were really big sellers during comics’ Golden Age, and for a couple of very obvious reasons. During the ghastly hell that was World War I, one group of military men lived under a chivalrous code (mostly, or at least gave the appearance of doing so): the aviators, who fought and died in flimsy canvas and wire contraptions thousands of feet in the sky. The stories of their exploits thrilled millions on the homefront. Later, in May 1927, Charles Lindbergh became the first man to successfully fly a plane solo across the Atlantic Ocean; the feat instantly made him the most famous man on earth.  More

Blame it on Blackhawk

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I hinted at the end of my previous post that this blog would soon be carrying a disclaimer. I have since added just such a virtual document, and you’ll find the link at the top of this page. The obvious question is, “Why do you need a disclaimer?”

I blame it on Blackhawk. More